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Daniel Pantaleo MURDERED Eric Garner

On July 17th, 2014, Eric Garner was standing on a street corner in Staten Island, New York, allegedly selling individual cigarettes (or “loosies”) as had become common in the area.  Previously arrested for the offense, and out on bail, cops had taken to calling him “cigarette man” and suspected him of continuing the practice.  A nearby street-fight had just broken out and he helped to break it up, but when the NYPD arrived in its aftermath they recognized Mr. Garner and suspected he’d been standing on that street corner, again, selling his supply of imported cigarettes.

We all saw what happened next when Officer Daniel Pantaleo took down and, ultimately, murdered Mr. Garner.  And, yes, he murdered him as I’ll outline in this analysis.

Let’s take a look at the video again and break down, moment by moment, why it’s clear the Grand Jury made a huge mistake by clearing Officer Pantaleo of wrongdoing.

 

Sequence One

0:00 – The video starts with Mr. Garner arguing his case. He’s pleading to be “left alone” and that he wasn’t doing anything. As far as I have seen, there were no cigarettes found on him and there was no evidence presented by police that he was selling cigarettes when this happened. If this is indeed the case, he has a right to object to police for the unwarranted harassment. There is no contact with police nor any threat of it. Officer Pantaleo is seen on the left with arms crossed.

 

0:08 - Mr. Garner continues to be adamant that he has done nothing wrong.  Officer Pantaleo appears board and is possibly adjusting his shorts as he sways.  He appears completely disinterested.  The cop in the foreground can't be heard, but appears to be talking quietly to Mr. Garner.  You can hear Mr. Garner responding only.

0:08 – Mr. Garner continues to be adamant that he has done nothing wrong.  Officer Pantaleo appears bored and is possibly adjusting his shorts as he sways.  He appears completely disinterested.  The cop in the foreground can’t be heard, but appears to be talking quietly to Mr. Garner.  You can hear Mr. Garner responding only.

 

0:12 - Officer Pantaleo is staring off in the distance behind him.  This clearly demonstrates that Mr. Garner is not, and has not, posed any threat to the officers.  If he had, direct attention would be paid.  This obviously cannot be disputed.

0:12 – Officer Pantaleo is staring off in the distance behind him.  This clearly demonstrates that Mr. Garner is not, and has not, posed any threat to the officers.  If he had, direct attention would be paid.  This cannot be disputed.

 

At 0:33, and much objection. the video cuts out with a cross-fade.  Clearly, there’s a gap in time here.  How much time has passed?  I’ve never seen it said, but let’s try to compare the environment before and after to estimate.  Firstly, Mr. Garner is still trying to plead his case to the cops.  Officer Pantaleo has appeared behind him and there is also another woman in the background as well.  A person we had seen crossing the street is now out of view, while a smaller group remains, so more than a few seconds have passed.  The officer in the foreground who has been speaking to Mr Garner appears to be taking a step from the position that he was in originally.  My guess is about 10-30 seconds have elapsed and the officer, in the meantime, has indicated to Mr. Garner that they are arresting him.  Clearly, though, no conflict has occurred with police and this is merely the police signaling their intent to arrest.

The moment the gap ends we see Officer Pantaleo making a first attempt to handcuff Mr. Garner. Mr. Garner is saying, “Please stop, don’t touch me,” and he appears to want to continue his case with the officer in the foreground.  It’s important to notice that Officer Pantaleo is the only one making contact with Mr. Garner.

 

0:37 - The critical sequence begins.  Officer Pantaleo has pulled Mr. Garner's right arm behind him.  This sequence happens quickly.

0:37 – The critical sequence begins.  Officer Pantaleo has pulled Mr. Garner’s right arm behind him.  This sequence will happen quickly.

 

0:37 - The critical sequence begins.  Officer Pantaleo has pulled Mr. Garner's right arm behind him.  This sequence happens quickly.

0:37 – Mr. Garner pulls his arm forward. He has it raised up with fingers spread as if he’s giving himself up, though he’s still talking to the officer. There’s still no threat. He is emphatic that he’s done nothing wrong and this seems justified. I would expect nobody who’s being arrested for no apparent reason would do any different up to this point.

 

0:38 - Officer Pantaleo immediately wraps his arms around Mr. Garner's neck.  What's very important at this moment is the only other cop even nearby is the foreground officer who has his hands up and touching Mr. Garner but hasn't yet made any restraining effort.  Watch this last second of footage again.  The only officer making any real physical contact with Mr. Garner is Officer Pantaleo who has just begun the "chokehold" maneuver on him.  The cops (and I use that term loosely as it's one guy at this point) have spent all of 1 second trying to arrest Mr. Garner.  I've seen many arguments that he was "resisting arrest," but clearly he has not.  He is objecting to being arrested.  Contrast with a suspect clearly resisting arrest with multiple cops attempting to handcuff him.  That is a man who is resisting arrest, is doing so for quite some time, with many more officers engaged.  Now re-watch the sequence with Mr. Garner and try to comprehend why Officer Pantaleo waited for 1 full second before resorting to the "chokehold."

0:38 – Only one second has passed and Officer Pantaleo immediately wraps his arms around Mr. Garner’s neck.  What’s very important at this moment is the only other cop even nearby is the foreground officer who has his hands up and touching Mr. Garner but hasn’t yet made any restraining effort.  Watch this last second of footage again.  The only officer making any real physical contact with Mr. Garner is Officer Pantaleo who has just begun the “chokehold” maneuver on him.  The cops (and I use that term loosely as it’s one guy at this point) have spent all of 1 second trying to arrest Mr. Garner!  I’ve seen many arguments that he was “resisting arrest,” but clearly he has not.  He is objecting to being arrested.

 

Now, contrast this with a different suspect clearly resisting arrest with multiple cops attempting to handcuff him.  That is a man who is resisting arrest, is doing so for quite some time, with many more officers engaged.  The cops’ behavior is completely justified and very few would argue it.  Now re-watch the sequence with Mr. Garner and try to comprehend why Officer Pantaleo waited for just 1 second before resorting to the “chokehold.”

0:41 - An interesting event no one seems to notice.  Mr. Garner has been pulled backward and, despite not struggling, he and Officer Pantaleo make impact with quite a deal of force on a nearby storefront window.  It's amazing they didn't break through it actually.  This would have been a very dangerous thing to happen and speaks to Officer Pantaleo's poor decision and technique.  Again, but until this very moment, Officer Pantaleo is still the only officer making significant physical contact with Mr. Garner, a 400-pound man.  Why on earth has he taken all of this upon himself?

0:41 – An interesting event no one seems to notice.  A off-balance Mr. Garner has been pulled backward and, despite not struggling, he and Officer Pantaleo make impact with quite a deal of force on a nearby storefront window.  It’s amazing they didn’t break through it actually.  This would have been a very dangerous thing to happen to both men and speaks to Officer Pantaleo’s poor decision and technique.  Again, until this very moment, Officer Pantaleo is still the only officer making significant physical contact with Mr. Garner, a 400-pound man.  Why on earth has he taken all of this upon himself and so quickly?

 

Sequence 7

0:43 –  Mr. Garner and Officer Pantaleo hit the ground and for the first time another officer will be able to help in handcuffing the man.  Officer Pantaleo is still maintaining his “chokehold.”

 

Sequence 9

0:49 – The defining moment of the whole event.  The clear shot of the “chokehold” still being maintained. It’s also apparent that Mr. Garner, on his side with a hand out, cannot possibly bring his right arm behind him due to the body of the officer on top of him. His airflow continues to be restricted and will be for some time.

 

Sequence 10

0:54 – Officer Pantaleo releasing the “chokehold” and is now applying his entire body weight on Mr. Garner’s head.  The elapsed time of the chokehold was 11 seconds! With another officer directly on top of Mr. Garner and applying handcuffs, it seems wholly unnecessary looking at the force being applied: two full hands and body weight on one man’s skull.  My sense is that the officer’s adrenaline is going full force and he’s continuing to satiate it past the point of need.

 

This is where Mr. Garner pleads, “I can’t breath!” for the first time.  He’ll state it 11 times in progressing desperation while Officer Pantaleo ignores him. According to the autopsy, Mr. Garner died due to compression of the neck.  At this point he is dying even though he’s no longer being choked.  Officer Pantaleo’s continued pressure on the head, however, is likely continuing to restrict his breathing.

At 1:01, it appears they have Mr. Garner handcuffed or at least he has submitted and is in the process of being handcuffed.

 

Sequence 11

1:05 – Officer Pantaleo has appeared to release his body weight off of Mr. Garner.  He applied pressure for 9 full seconds!

 

At this point, Eric Garner is dying and will leave his 6 children fatherless.  He stops breathing and, after 7 minutes elapse, he’s put on an ambulance where he has a heart attack and dies.  In these 7 minutes, he receives no medical care but many cops do put their hand on him for some reason as seen in a second video. Officer Pantaleo also playfully waves at the camera 7 minutes after watching a breathless man die right before his eyes.  This is not remorse, this is satisfaction and ambivalence.

In my opinion, based on analysis of the tape, Officer Pantaleo demonstrated incompetent judgement in trying to handle the arrest by himself.  He was bored and impatient while the foreground officer properly attempted to reason with Mr. Garner. He was the kid in the back of the classroom who didn’t take class seriously. When it came time to make the arrest, he jumped into action with excitement and no precaution.  He simply wanted to brag that he took down this man all by himself and jumped in ahead of the team. Observing his behavior, he seems to take much joy in taking down Eric Garner much as a hunter loves taking pictures with dead animals.

Prior to this incident, Officer Pantaleo had been sued several times for his shoddy police work, once while improperly strip searching men in broad daylight as well as false arrests. He neither understands proper procedures nor knows how to accurately apply the proper ones. Immediately following the incident, he was removed from beat work and is confined to working at a desk indefinitely.

He should be in jail.

 

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About John Blanco

John Blanco is an avid game collector and loves to write about his hobby as much as he participates in it. He run the Denver Retro Gamers Facebook group in Denver, Colorado, and coordinates swap-style meetups with dozens of other collectors every couple of months.

One thought on “Daniel Pantaleo MURDERED Eric Garner

  1. I find it funny when someone who has absolutely no law enforcement training or experience can break down exactly what’s going on in an officers mind as well as assume what precipitated an incident just by watching a 1-2 minute clip of an incident. An officer looks behind him and “clearly he is bored and disinterested”? From someone who has first hand law enforcement knowledge and experience in police tactics, that officer looking around is checking to see if a crowd is forming from this disturbance. It’s called a safety tactic. It’s also funny that someone can come to the conclusion and judge an officers entire career and make defamatory remarks about his character and integrity by watching a 1-2 minute clip of one incident. Shame.

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